Tenants March to Stop Giveaways to Wall Street Landlords

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US Department of Labor announces up to $1.7M to help recovery, clean-up efforts after March 2016 storms, flooding in Louisiana

US Department of Labor announces up to $ 1.7M to help recovery, clean-up efforts after March 2016 storms, flooding in Louisiana
Left to right: Louisiana Workforce Commission Executive Director Ava Dejoie joined Gov. John Bel Edwards and Deputy U.S. Secretary of Labor Chris Lu in Baton Rouge today to announce a National Dislocated Worker Grant of nearly $  1.7M to help 21 of the stat

Left to right: Louisiana Workforce Commission Executive
Director Ava Dejoie joined Gov. John Bel Edwards
and Deputy U.S. Secretary of Labor Chris Lu in Baton
Rouge today to announce a National Dislocated Worker
Grant of nearly $ 1.7M to help 21 of the state’s parishes
recover from storms and flooding in March 2016.

BATON ROUGE, La. – U.S. Deputy Secretary of Labor Chris Lu announced today in Baton Rouge that the department would provide a National Dislocated Worker Grant for up to nearly $ 1.7 million to the state’s Workforce Commission to create temporary jobs to assist recovery and clean-up after severe storms and flooding in the state’s northern parishes in March 2016. Of the $ 1,699,317 announced today, $ 1 million will be released initially.

“National Dislocated Worker Grants are an important way for the federal government to help communities around the country respond in the face of crisis,” said Lu, who was joined by Gov. John Bel Edwards at the announcement. “The funds announced today will help support recovery and clean-up efforts in 21 parishes across northern Louisiana, an important step in helping these communities get back on track.”

The Federal Emergency Management Agency made a major disaster declaration in 26 of the state’s parishes on March 13, 2016, after storms and flooding struck the region. This grant provide assistance to support recovery and clean-up efforts in 21 of those parishes: Ascension, Bienville, Bossier, Caddo, Caldwell, Claiborne, DeSoto, Grant, LaSalle, Livingston, Madison, Morehouse, Natchitoches, Ouachita, Richland, Tangipahoa, Union, Washington, Webster, West Carroll and Winn.

The funds will provide for temporary employment on projects to assist with clean up, demolition, repair, renovation and reconstruction of destroyed public structures, facilities and lands within the affected communities. They will support delivery of humanitarian aid and safety assistance as needed. The grant will also fund work on the homes of economically disadvantaged individuals eligible for the federally funded weatherization program, with priority given to services for the elderly and individuals with disabilities.

The NDWG program provides resources to states and other eligible applicants to respond to large, unexpected events causing significant job losses. Grants are awarded at the discretion of the secretary of labor under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act.

Release Date: 
04/12/2016
Media Contact Name: 

Joe Versen

Phone Number: 
Release Number: 
16-0770-NAT
Override with PDF?: 

|||||||https://www.dol.gov/newsroom/releases/eta/eta20160412

Sunburn for March 28 – Gov. Scott signs raft of bills; Big reads about HIV, Visit Florida; Fundraisers and … – Florida Politics (blog)

Sunburn for March 28 – Gov. Scott signs raft of bills; Big reads about HIV, Visit Florida; Fundraisers and
Florida Politics (blog)
By Peter Schorsch, Phil Ammann, Jenna Buzzacco-Foerster, Mitch Perry, Ryan Ray, and Jim Rosica. Good Monday morning. We hope that your Easter was filled with family, friends, and reflection about the true meaning of the holiday. With Spring Break over, …

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Statement of US Labor Secretary Perez on March employment numbers

Statement of US Labor Secretary Perez on March employment numbers

WASHINGTON – U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez issued the following statement about the March 2016 Employment Situation report released today:

“The remarkable U.S. recovery continues, as total nonfarm employment increased by 215,000 in March. Beginning just a year after President Obama inherited the worst economic crisis in generations, businesses have been adding jobs at an extended, record-setting clip: a total of 14.4 million jobs over the last 73 consecutive months of private-sector job growth. The March unemployment rate was little changed at 5.0 percent. The labor force participation rate and employment-population ratio are trending up, reaching two-year and seven-year highs respectively.

“Other indicators continue to demonstrate a vibrant, growing economy. Consumer confidence increased last month; the labor market continues to strengthen, with 5.5 million job openings as of the end of January; weekly initial unemployment insurance claims remain consistently low in a way we haven’t seen in more than four decades. Meanwhile, the recovery began at just about the moment the Affordable Care Act was signed into law, six years ago last week. So much for the doomsday predictions that the ACA would wreck the economy – all it’s done is bring the uninsured rate at or near an all-time low, with more than nine in 10 Americans now enjoying health coverage.

“There are so many reasons to be bullish about our economic future, but we can’t become complacent about the challenges that remain. Continued weakness in manufacturing, for example, is a reminder that we must keep working to restore balance to the economy, to ensure that the recovery benefits people in all communities, up and down the income spectrum.

“As I make house calls in my travels across the country, I meet with people whose hard work isn’t rewarded with fair pay, who can barely get by, let alone get ahead. Average hourly earnings increased by 7 cents in March. But the long-range trend of flat wages, pre-dating the Great Recession by several decades, remains our greatest barrier to shared prosperity. That’s why the recent decision by two of the nation’s largest states to adopt the nation’s highest minimum wage, $ 15 per hour phased in over time, is such good news. This historic step will give millions of New Yorkers and Californians a raise.

“We continue to do everything possible to strengthen the middle class and give working people the economic stability they deserve. We are investing aggressively in the skills and talents of our people – most recently taking steps to help low-income seniors, migrant farmworkers, the people of Flint, Michigan, and young adults involved in the criminal justice system get the training that will lead to good jobs. During the last month, we have also completed final regulations providing important workplace protections – one to reduce exposure to deadly silica dust in construction and other industries, and another to provide workers with better information as they decide whether to join a union.

“The wind is once again at our back; now we have to make sure it propels everyone forward. Building an economy that works for everyone – helping working people get a bigger slice of a growing pie they helped bake – is the unfinished business we will continue tackling in the remaining months of this administration.”

Release Date: 
04/01/2016
Media Contact Name: 

David Roberts

Phone Number: 
Release Number: 
16-0678-NAT
Override with PDF?: 

|||||||https://www.dol.gov/newsroom/releases/opa/opa20160401

Community calendar from March 29 – Troy Record

Community calendar from March 29
Troy Record
Stop by and browse the many rooms of housewares, clothing- including prom/wedding gowns, linens, toys, games, puzzles home décor, furniture and more all at bargain prices. Enjoy a treat and conversation with our friendly workers. Open every Thursday …

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Rutgers University Students Against Sweatshops march to Old Queens – RU Daily Targum


RU Daily Targum
Rutgers University Students Against Sweatshops march to Old Queens
RU Daily Targum
“The football and basketball players receive the lowest wages — zero, that is. Ironically — as part of their unpaid jobs — sports workers wear the apparel and act as billboards for the very corporations underpaying workers overseas,” said Hughes

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Rutgers University Students Against Sweatshops march to Old Queens – RU Daily Targum


RU Daily Targum
Rutgers University Students Against Sweatshops march to Old Queens
RU Daily Targum
“The football and basketball players receive the lowest wages — zero, that is. Ironically — as part of their unpaid jobs — sports workers wear the apparel and act as billboards for the very corporations underpaying workers overseas,” said Hughes

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The 1.5 Million Man March

missing-black-african-american-men

(Image: Nathan Congleton / Flickr)

There are several types of missing persons.

Some missing people are missed so publicly that their absence is a presence. Vanished children reappeared on milk cartons and then later in amber alerts. American soldiers, killed in action or MIA, look out at us from rows of photos like headstones in the newspaper on Memorial Day. Mothers assembled with signs and photos in Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires in the 1970s to demand information about their children who’d disappeared during Argentina’s “dirty war.”

Then there are the missing that don’t exist at all.

Rather, they should exist — for instance, the missing girls of Asia. Because of declining fertility, prenatal screening, and a cultural preference for boy babies, families in China, Taiwan, Korea, India, and a few places outside Asia (such as the Balkans and the Caucasus) have altered the natural biological balance of about 105 male babies to 100 female babies. This disparity has been most prominent in China, where the ratio today is 123 boy babies to 100 girl babies. As a result of this selective breeding, Asia as a whole is missing upwards of 163 million women.

The case of the girls-that-should-be came to light in the 1980s and generated a new term: gendercide.

This gender imbalance, according to several popular theories, will tilt China in a radically different direction. A 1-percent increase in the ratio in favor of boys, argue researchers Jane Golley and Rod Tyers, yields a 5-percent increase in the crime rate. That doesn’t speak highly of the social usefulness of testosterone, but it may help to explain the explosion of crime and unrest in China.

An entire book has been devoted to the likelihood that all these “bare branches,” as young unmarried Chinese men are known, will push the country into waging war on its neighbors. My guess is that these single men will more likely channel their sex drive into making money, playing computer games, and (as is happening so frequently in South Korea) marrying women from other lands.

Whatever the consequences of China’s gender imbalance, the point is: the missing will make their mark.

In a third category are the absent who certainly exist, but given how little public attention they receive, they’re like the proverbial trees falling in an unpopulated forest. Into this category are the nameless political prisoners who languish in labor camps in North Korea and elsewhere, the people who try to cross borders but end up as skeletons in the Arizona desert or bodies washed up on the Mediterranean coastline, and the “untouchables” who occupy such a low caste in society that they are practically invisible.

And then there are the missing African-American men.

The 1.5 Million Man March

America is a land of enclaves. The rich cluster, and so do the poor, and this segregation has only intensified over the last two decades. Race plays a role in this, as it does in everything in America.

These maps of major American cities demonstrate just how racially segregated our residential lives remain, from the 8 Mile Road that sharply divides whites and blacks in Detroit to the clear racial separation between north and south St. Louis. Barack Obama notwithstanding, racism is real. Check out the Brave New Films video that portrays the differing responses to nearly identical resumes, constituent letters, and so on submitted by whites and African Americans.

But one of the most remarkable symbols of racial discrimination are the missing African-American men. According to an analysis last month in The New York Times, 1.5 million African American men have gone missing in this country.

You won’t see them on the side of milk cartons or arrayed in an honorable display in the newspaper. These men are missing because, for the most part, they’ve died young or they’re in prison. They are mourned and missed by their families and friends, and their absence is certainly a presence in predominantly African-American communities. This gender imbalance is also a topic in Essence and on the blogs. But it comes up more in dating forums than in the kind of public policy quarters that have devoted so much attention to Asia’s missing girls.

To be blunt, this problem is less about love and more about war.

To understand the anger in the African-American community in the United States — which has exploded in Ferguson, Baltimore, and other places — it’s important to understand the war that’s taking place across the country. The victims of this war are young black men, some of them involved in drugs and gangs, some shot as innocent bystanders, others killed by the police. Homicide is the leading cause of death for young men between the ages of 25 and 54. Many others have been taken prisoner, locked away for decades on drug charges because of mandatory sentencing.

“More than one out of every six black men who today should be between 25 and 54 years old have disappeared from daily life,” The New York Times reports. This gender gap doesn’t exist among babies and little children. It only begins to appear in the teenage years.

Where is this gap most prevalent? At the top of the list in terms of percentages is Ferguson, Missouri. In terms of sheer numbers, New York is number one and Baltimore comes in sixth. In places where black male lives seem to matter so little, it’s no surprise that the African-American community reacts so strongly to the kind of policing that reduces those numbers even further.

The Compensation Effect

What makes the absence of African-American men so glaring on the ground is their total lack of absence in other fields of public life in the United States.

Black men dominate the music charts, grace both the silver screen and the small screen, lead most of the sporting leagues, and, yes, occupy the White House. WEB DuBois once spoke of the “talented tenth” of African Americans who would excel in various professions if loosed from the shackles of racism. In our age of growing polarity, only the talented hundredth (or thousandth) has scaled the heights of fame.

But that’s what makes the MAAM (Missing African-American Men) phenomenon so troubling. White America appears to be inundated with black men, but it’s just an appearance, a hall of mirrors. Barack Obama and Samuel R. Jackson and Chris Rock and Kobe Bryant and Kanye West — and now Ben Carson — are reflected in the media so many times that we have the illusion that there are more African Americans in public than there really are.

White people don’t grapple with the MAAM problem because not that many African Americans live in their enclaves to begin with. On top of that, the visibility of famous black men sends a soothing signal that race is no longer an issue in post-racial America.

It’s also a question of numbers. Sure, 1.5 million people sounds like a lot, but it’s less than 1 percent of the population. Similarly, we expect average North Koreans and Chinese to be in a constant state of outrage over their political prisoners, but those unfortunates too represent a very small fraction of the population. In Shirley Jackson’s famous short story “The Lottery,” the community sacrifices one person annually to maintain its cohesion and stability. In our day, we only stone a couple people every year (there were 35 executions in the United States in 2014). Jail is second “prize” in our modern lottery.

The United States continues to have the largest prison population on the planet. The total number of people who are missing from society is, again, around 1.5 million (though the number rises when you include people cycling through county jails). The gender breakdown: 93 percent male.

China has yet to figure out what to do with its bare branches. The United States is dealing with all the testosterone by bottling it up — in jail.

But remember, the missing will always make their mark.

The post The 1.5 Million Man March appeared first on Institute for Policy Studies.

John Feffer is the director of Foreign Policy In Focus, a project of the Institute for Policy Studies.

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Uber’s global march continues with launch in Athens, Greece despite ongoing … – VentureBeat


VentureBeat
Uber's global march continues with launch in Athens, Greece despite ongoing
VentureBeat
The e-hailing app has just officially launched in Athens, Greece, kicking off with its UberTaxi service. UberTaxi is open to local taxi drivers and their existing vehicles, thus bypassing the need for posh shiny cars as may be expected from other Uber

and more »

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